When using Vulcan’s default resolvers, two types of queries are automatically generated for every collection: the single query (which returns a single document) and the multi query (which returns a list of documents).

A set of default query resolvers is generated on the server to power these queries; and a set of client-side higher-order components and hooks is provided to make working with those queries easier.

API

All Vulcan queries follow the single argument pattern. In other words, they take a single input argument that encapsulates all of the query’s variables; and they return a single output object that contains all the query data.

Single Query

Here is an example single query definition for a Movie type:

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movie(input: SingleMovieInput): SingleMovieOutput

And here’s an example query:

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query myMovie {
movie(input: { filter: { name: { _eq: "Die Hard" } } } ) {
result {
_id
name
year
description
}
}
}

Multi Query

Here is an example multi query definition for a Movie type:

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movies(input: MultiMovieInput): MultiMovieOutput

And here’s an example query:

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query myMovies {
movies(input: { filter: { year: { _eq: 1999 } } } ) {
results {
_id
name
year
description
}
}
}

Input Argument

Both single and multi queries take the same arguments (with the exception of limit, which is only available for the multi query). The only difference is that in the case of the single query, if the filter argument selects more than one document only the first document of the set will be returned.

The input takes the following properties:

  • filter: the object that lets you select the specific documents to return.
  • sort: how to order the results.
  • limit: how many results to return.
  • offset: how many results to skip.
  • search: a shortcut for searching across all searchable fields at once.
  • _id: a shortcut for selecting a specific document by _id.
  • enableCache: whether to enable caching for this query
  • allowNull: whether to return null instead of throwing an error when no document is found.

Here is an example input type for the Movie type:

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input SingleMovieInput {
filter: MovieFilterInput
sort: MovieSortInput
search: String
_id: String
enableCache: Boolean
allowNull: Boolean
}

You can learn more about these arguments in the filtering section.

Client

Vulcan also offers built-in client-side helpers that will generate the right GraphQL query for you.

Hooks

useSingle

TODO

useMulti

TODO

Higher-Order Components

To make working with Apollo easier, Vulcan provides you with a set of higher-order components (HoCs).

An HoC is simply a function you can call on a React component to give it additional props. Think of it as a mechanic’s assistant following along with a little toolbox, ready to hand over a screwdriver or socket wrench at the appropriate time.

withMulti

The withMulti HoC is used to display lists of documents. It takes the following options:

Options
  • collection: the collection on which to look for the list resolver.
  • collectionName: alternatively, you can also pass the collection name as a string.
  • fragment or fragmentName: the fragment to use. If you pass fragmentName instead of fragment, the name you passed will be used to look up a fragment registered with registerFragment.
  • input: an optional input object used to filter the data received (see filtering section). This argument can also be passed dynamically as a prop (see below).

For example:

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const listOptions = {
collection: Movies,
fragmentName: 'MoviesItem',
};

export default withMulti(listOptions)(movies);
Accepted Props

The resulting wrapped component also accepts a dynamic input object as a prop.

This can be useful when you want your data to change based on some user action such as selecting filtering options in a dropdown, changing sorting order, etc.

The dynamic input will always take priority over any “static” input defined in the HoC’s initial options.

Passed-on Props

The HoC then passes on the following props to the wrapped component:

  • loading: true while the data is loading.
  • results: the loaded array of documents.
  • totalCount: the total count of results.
  • count: the number of current results (i.e. results.length).
  • refetch: a function that can be called to trigger a query refetch.
  • loadMore: a function that can be called to load more data.

withSingle

The withSingle HoC displays a single document.

Options & Props

It takes the same options and props as withMulti, except that its input can have an _id property and doesn’t support the limit property.

Passed-on Props

This HoC then passes on the following child prop:

  • loading: true while the data is loading.
  • document: the loaded document.
  • refetch: a function that can be called to trigger a query refetch.

Server

Resolvers

Vulcan provides a set of default List, Single and Total resolvers you can use to save time by calling getDefaultResolvers(collectionName):

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import {
createCollection,
getDefaultResolvers,
getDefaultMutations
} from 'meteor/vulcan:core';
import schema from './schema.js';

const Movies = createCollection({
typeName: 'Movie',

schema,

resolvers: getDefaultResolvers(options),

mutations: getDefaultMutations(options)
});

export default Movies;

The options object can have the following properties:

  • typeName (String): the resolver’s type name (required).
  • cacheMaxAge (Number): a custom cache age (in seconds) for the resolvers.

To learn more about what exactly the default resolvers do, you can find their code here.

Custom Resolvers

In some cases, you will want to go beyond the three default resolvers. For example, you might want to create a resolver that returns a single random post, or the current user. You can do so by using addGraphQLResolvers and addGraphQLQuery:

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import { addGraphQLResolvers, addGraphQLQuery } from 'meteor/vulcan:core';

const currentUserResolver = {
Query: {
currentUser(root, args, context) {
return context.Users.findOne({ _id: args.userId });
}
}
};
addGraphQLResolvers(currentUserResolver);

addGraphQLQuery(`currentUser: User`);

addGraphQLResolvers adds the actual resolver function, while addGraphQLQuery adds the corresponding query type (if your new resolver is not mentioned in your GraphQL schema, you won’t be able to query it).

Learn more about resolvers in the Apollo documentation.

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